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  CLEO Blog - LSAT Preparation
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September 21, 2010
  LSAT October 9: Your Last 15 Days!


The LSAT is less than 15 days away, and you need to seriously evaluate your preparedness! Lots of us get nervous as the big day draws near, and a little apprehension is understandable. But, you should not be taking the LSAT if you are under-prepared or consistently scoring badly on practice tests. Rate your readiness with this short guide and then make the right choice for you. The LSAT is not an "If you fail - try, try, again" event!

Have you completed at least four practice tests?
Four full practice tests will give you a fair average of your LSAT range. You should never be surprised by the score you get on your LSAT. An actual LSAT score can swing as low as 7 points below your average practice test. Do you know your range? Have you searched the LSAT law school database using your GPA and practice LSAT score?


Have you learned and practiced the strategies for the Logical Reasoning and Analytical Reasoning sections?
Completing these three 35-minute timed sections of the LSAT is dependent on understanding the questions and how to work the answer. There is no time to be surprised or to "wonder how to find" the answer. Each second counts!


Are you taking the LSAT now because you "have to make a deadline"?
If you are worried about an application deadline, then you are probably distracted from LSAT preparation. You can submit your application in November and your LSAT scores can follow. Do not send low scores with your application only to see your Dream Schools disappear.


If you are feeling unprepared, click on this link to find a guide to managing the December or February LSAT tests. Don't run from a challenge, but if you do decide that the October 9th LSAT is not for you, then visit the LSAC Test Date Center website and research your options.

If you know that you are ready to take the LSAT on October 9th, then let's make the most of the time you have left. Use the remaining days to focus on these three areas:

The Questions and the Test:
Manage your next 15 days to optimize your strengths. Don't try to tackle studying all the questions at once.
  1. Choose four days to focus on specific sections of the LSAT. Dedicate one day to each type of question. Select three-five sample questions (use the June 2007 LSAT as a guide) and work them to completion. Compare your answers to the answer sheet in the test booklet.
  2. Choose two days to focus only on the section you can most quickly improve
  3. Choose one day to write two essays from the essay section.


Fine-tune your practice by preventing tiny mistakes. At this point you should only make small adjustments to your test strategy.


Materials for the Test Day:
Build your Test Day Packet now!
  1. You are allowed two #2 pencils, one highlighter, erasers, a beverage in a plastic bottle/juice box, and tissues. You can bring a watch, but not a digital one.
  2. Most important, have your Admission Ticket and a current government issued ID with your photo and your signature. Acceptable forms of ID include: passport book or driver's license. Employment IDs and passport cards are not permitted.


Take Care of Yourself:
The LSAT is not a test you cram for, and staying up late Friday night re-hashing questions will only exhaust you. The LSAT requires you to arrive no later than 8:30 a.m., so balance your sleep and eating over the next fifteen days.
  1. If you work best on 5-6 hours, don't change to 8-10 hours, and vice-versa.
  2. And, if you do not eat a lot of fast food normally, don't start now. Griffon Prep, a DC area LSAT Prep company, can help you find balance in yourself with strategies to deal with test anxiety and sustain the 4 hours of the LSAT.


Being successful on the LSAT is like being successful in all things.
  1. Research the test
  2. Learn and practice the methods
  3. Execute your plan to the best of your ability
And, don't forget to breathe...



    Posted By: matthewniziol @ 09/21/2010 09:18 AM     LSAT Preparation     Comments (0)  

May 4, 2010
  Crush The LSAT!
If you are serious about law school, then you are in one of two positions right now. Either you have been comfortably studying for the next LSAT test date or you are frantically planning to practice day and night for the four grueling hours of the LSAT.

If you have been studying for the last three months, the first thing you want to do is breathe. And breathe easily because thousands of law school applicants are taking the same test, they are just as nervous, and you will survive.
If you have NOT been studying for months, then let's do what attorneys do when they panic - make a plan and get it done!
    So, right now, determine how prepared you are for the LSAT and commit 100% to your test date.


The next two months will be your last chance weeks to prepare for the LSAT. Start by learning what the LSAT measures and how to approach each question type. Simply practicing the same questions over and over will only help you improve the questions you already understand. Review LSAT sample questions/guides to learn how to solve each question so that when the particulars change your strategy does not.

Stress, college deadlines, friends and family can all distract law school applicants during these last weeks. The best way to be successful is to create a schedule and Stick to a Clear Plan.



Plan to study as much as you practice. A schedule that has 1.5 hours of study time and 1 hour of practice time repeated 3 times a week is a good start. You will need to increase the frequency of your practice as the test date draws nearer.

Week One: Study one section of the LSAT and complete one timed 35 minute practice section.
Total test time 35 minutes.
Study the Logical Reasoning section, and
Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test


Week Two: Study a new section of the LSAT, review the previous section. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Two section and the Week One section.
Total test time 70 minutes.

Study the Analytical Reasoning Section, and
Complete a 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test

Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


Week Three: Study a new section of the LSAT and review the previous two sections. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Three section and the weeks One and Two sections.
Total test time 105 minutes.

Study the Reading Comprehension Section, and
Complete a 35 minute timed Reading Comprehension practice test
Complete a 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test

Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


Week Four: Study the section of the LSAT in which you have received the lowest practice score, and complete a sample Writing Section. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Four section, the Writing Sample, and the weeks One, Two, and Three sections.
Total test time 175 minutes.

Study the LSAT Section in which you received your Lowest Score, and
Complete one 35 minute timed Writing Sample
Complete one 35 minute timed Reading Comprehension practice test
Complete one 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
Complete two 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice tests

Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


One last word on study and practice: Evaluate! If you only take a practice LSAT once, you will not have a clear history of success. The LSAT can be affected by your stress and anxiety, restfulness, or concentration and distraction. Build a track record of success by taking the practice test multiple times (at least 3 times). Evaluate your speed in each section, the types of questions you consistently answer correctly and incorrectly, and how often you guess versus knowing the answer.

Finally, seek experts to teach you. You do not need to do this alone. CLEO Juniors Jumpstart the LSAT, Prelaw Advisors, your classmates, and Test Prep organizations can be excellent person-to-person resources.

Choose the Test Preparation program that is right for you. In the D.C. area, Griffon Prep has a trusted reputation when working with under-represented students. Their website is a treasure chest of LSAT Prep information including:

5 Tiny Mistakes in LSAT Games that can Cost Big Points
Sample Logic Game with timer
A Few Ideas for Dealing with Test Anxiety


The Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) has a thorough resource website. You can download or purchase practice exams and guides from LSAC, and seek advice from CLEO. You can also watch this LSAT Video for more guidance on how to study.

Being successful on the LSAT is like being successful in all things. Research the measures, prepare and practice the methods, and execute your plan to the best of your ability! And, don't forget to breathe...


Edited: 09/20/2010 at 11:10 AM by matthewniziol



    Posted By: matthewniziol @ 05/04/2010 04:03 PM     LSAT Preparation     Comments (0)  

  LSAT SEPTEMBER 26th: Are You Ready for The Last 10 Days!
The LSAT is less than 10 days away, and you need to seriously evaluate your preparedness! Lots of us get nervous as the big day draws near, and a little apprehension is understandable. But, you should not be taking the LSAT if you are under-prepared or consistently scoring badly on practice tests. Rate your readiness with this short guide and then make the right choice for you. The LSAT is not an "If you fail - try, try, again" event!

Have you completed at least four practice tests?
Four full practice tests will give you a fair average of your LSAT range. You should never be surprised by the score you get on your LSAT. An actual LSAT score can swing as low as 7 points below your average practice test. Do you know your range?


Have you learned and practiced the strategies for the Logical Reasoning and Analytical Reasoning sections?
Completing these three 35-minute timed sections of the LSAT is dependent on understanding the questions and how to work the answer. There is no time to be surprised or to "wonder how to find" the answer. Each second counts!


Are you taking the LSAT now because you "have to make a deadline"?
If you are worried about an application deadline, then you are probably distracted from LSAT preparation. You can submit your application in November and your LSAT scores can follow. Do not send low scores with your application only to see your Dream Schools disappear.


If you are feeling unprepared, click on this link to find a guide to managing the December or February LSAT tests. Don't run from a challenge, but if you do decide that the September 26th LSAT is not for you, then visit the LSAC Test Date Center website and research your options. If you know that you are ready to take the LSAT on September 26th, then let's make the most of the time you have left. Use the remaining days to focus on these three areas:

The Questions and the Test:
Manage your next 10 days to optimize your strengths. Don't try to tackle studying all the questions at once.
  1. Choose four days to focus on specific sections of the LSAT. Dedicate one day to each type of question. Select three-five sample questions (use the June 2007 LSAT as a guide) and work them to completion. Compare your answers to the answer sheet in the test booklet.
  2. Choose two days to focus only on the section you can most quickly improve
  3. Choose one day to write two essays from the essay section.


Materials for the Test Day:
Build your Test Day Packet now!
  1. You are allowed two #2 pencils, one highlighter, erasers, a beverage in a plastic bottle/juice box, and tissues. You can bring a watch, but not a digital one.
  2. Most important, have your Admission Ticket and a current government issued ID with your photo and your signature. Acceptable forms of ID include: passport book or driver's license. Employment IDs and passport cards are not permitted.


Take Care of Yourself:
The LSAT is not a test you cram for, and staying up late Friday night re-hashing questions will only exhaust you. The LSAT requires you to arrive no later than 8:30 a.m., so balance your sleep and eating over the next ten days.
  1. If you work best on 5-6 hours, don't change to 8-10 hours, and vice-versa.
  2. And, if you do not eat a lot of fast food normally, don't start now. Find balance in yourself so that you can sustain the 4 hours of the LSAT.


Being successful on the LSAT is like being successful in all things.
  1. Research the test
  2. Learn and practice the methods
  3. Execute your plan to the best of your ability
And, don't forget to breathe...



    Posted By: matthewniziol @ 05/04/2010 03:50 PM     LSAT Preparation     Comments (0)  

  JUNE LSAT: TICK - TOCK - TICK - TOCK!
If you are serious about law school, then you are in one of two positions right now. Either you have been comfortably studying for the June 8th test date or you are frantically planning to practice day and night for the four grueling hours of the LSAT.

  • If you have been studying for the last three months, the first thing you want to do is breathe. And breathe easily because thousands of law school applicants are taking the same test, they are just as nervous, and you will survive.

  • If you have NOT been studying for months, then let's do what attorneys do when they panic - make a plan and get it done!

      So, right now, determine how prepared you are for the LSAT and commit 100% to your test date.


  • The month of May will be your last four weeks to prepare for the LSAT. Start by learning what the LSAT measures and how to approach each question type. Simply practicing the same questions over and over will only help you improve the questions you already understand. Review LSAT sample questions/guides to learn how to solve each question so that when the particulars change your strategy does not.

    Stress, college deadlines, friends and family can all distract law school applicants during these last weeks. The best way to be successful is to create a schedule and Stick to a Clear Plan.



    Plan to study as much as you practice. A schedule that has 1.5 hours of study time and 1 hour of practice time repeated 3 times a week is a good start. You will need to increase the frequency of your practice as the test date draws nearer.

    Week One: Study one section of the LSAT and complete one timed 35 minute practice section.
    Total test time 35 minutes.

  • Study the Logical Reasoning section, and
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test


  • Week Two: Study a new section of the LSAT, review the previous section. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Two section and the Week One section.
    Total test time 70 minutes.

  • Study the Analytical Reasoning Section, and
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test

    Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


  • Week Three: Study a new section of the LSAT and review the previous two sections. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Three section and the weeks One and Two sections.
    Total test time 105 minutes.

  • Study the Reading Comprehension Section, and
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Reading Comprehension practice test
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
  • Complete a 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice test

    Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


  • Week Four: Study the section of the LSAT in which you have received the lowest practice score, and complete a sample Writing Section. Complete a 35 minute timed test for the Week Four section, the Writing Sample, and the weeks One, Two, and Three sections.
    Total test time 175 minutes.

  • Study the LSAT Section in which you received your Lowest Score, and
  • Complete one 35 minute timed Writing Sample
  • Complete one 35 minute timed Reading Comprehension practice test
  • Complete one 35 minute timed Analytical Reasoning practice test
  • Complete two 35 minute timed Logical Reasoning practice tests

    Special Study Note: Complete one full practice exam at the end of the week.


  • One last word on study and practice: Evaluate! If you only take a practice LSAT once, you will not have a clear history of success. The LSAT can be affected by your stress and anxiety, restfulness, or concentration and distraction. Build a track record of success by taking the practice test multiple times (at least 3 times). Evaluate your speed in each section, the types of questions you consistently answer correctly and incorrectly, and how often you guess versus knowing the answer.

    The Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) has a thorough resource website. You can download or purchase practice exams and guides from LSAC, and seek advice from CLEO. You can also watch this LSAT Video for more guidance on how to study.

    Also, seek out experts to teach you. You do not need to do this alone. CLEO , Prelaw Advisors, Test Prep organizations, and your classmates can be excellent person-to-person resources.

    Being successful on the LSAT is like being successful in all things. Research the measures, prepare and practice the methods, and execute your plan to the best of your ability! And, don't forget to breathe...



        Posted By: matthewniziol @ 05/04/2010 03:46 PM     LSAT Preparation     Comments (0)  

      The Law School Admissions Test (LSAT): Monster or Manageable?
    If you are serious about law school, then you are in one of two positions right now. Either you have recently taken the four grueling hours of the LSAT, or you are practicing day and night for the next LSAT exam. Let's do what attorneys do when they are at a crossroads - make a plan!

    If you have already taken your LSAT exam, then the next step is to actively wait. That's right! You cannot change your score now so let's spend the twenty three days after the test and before your scores are posted online to get things done. First, expect the best and move ahead with your admissions plan. CLEO's Achieving Success in the Application Process (ASAP) program can help. Complete your personal statement and submit your law school applications. Your scores will follow your application to the schools you choose via the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC).

    Second, evaluate your scores realistically. If your score does not make you eligible for a law school at this time, then evaluate your goals, review your timeline, and get started again. If your score makes you competitive for the schools of your choice, then it is time to show the admissions panel the best parts of your character not captured by a standardized test.

    If you have not taken the LSAT exam yet, the first thing you want to do is breathe. But, breathe easily because thousands of law school applicants are taking the same test, they are just as nervous, and you will survive.

    Yes, the LSAT is a tremendously important test. Your individual score - on a scale from 120-180 and in comparison to your fellow test takers - will weigh heavily in the admissions process. And yes, the test is only offered four times a year (February, June, September/October, and December). And yes, you do not want to take this test more than once.


    In order to be confident when you complete the LSAT it is important to know exactly what you are getting into. The LSAT has been painstakingly reviewed and documented. LSAC has a thorough resource website. You can download or purchase practice exams and guides from LSAC or college and commercial bookstores. You also have CLEO sponsoring the prelaw College Scholars events in major cities across the nation. Do as lawyers do...research, prepare, practice, and execute!

    Start by learning what the LSAT measures and how to prepare for and practice each part. The LSAT is a logic and reasoning test. It is not a facts and dates test.

    The LSAT, like the legal profession, is concerned with your ability to rationally, logically, and analytically resolve complex situations.


    The LSAT is a half day test comprising of five sections of 35 multiple choice questions. The three multiple choice sections are: Logical Reasoning (twice), Analytical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension. One section of the LSAT will be used to test future questions and is not tallied into your score. However, this section is indistinguishable from the rest of the test. The final section is an un-scored writing sample that is sent to each law school to which you apply.

    I know you want to know numbers. The national average on the LSAT is generally in the 150-155 range. But to be competitive you will need to aim for a score in the highest percentiles.

    Preparing and practicing for the LSAT is a full time commitment and the most effective path to a high score. The LSAT exams offered in the June and September immediately following your junior year are recommended because your scores will arrive in November with your application; and if you are a current student you can prepare and practice with less academic intrusion from your other classes.

    Know that it is never too early to begin preparing and practicing for the LSAT


    Plan to prepare/study as much as you practice. A 1.5 hour prep time vs. 1 hour practice time schedule repeated 3 times a week is a good start. You will need to increase the frequency of your practice as the test date draws nearer.


    Seek out experts to teach you. CLEO's Sophomore Super Saturdays, Juniors Jumpstart the LSAT, and Sophomore Summer Institute are excellent person-to-person resources. LSAT preparation texts can be purchased, but remember that not all texts are alike. Scrutinize the different options (texts, videos, online options) before choosing the one that best matches your learning method.


    Simply practicing questions over and over will not help you improve anything, but the questions you already understand. LSAT question types and suggested approaches to solving the question should be studied so that when the particulars of a question change your strategy does not.

    One last word on preparation and practice: Evaluate! If you only take a practice LSAT once, you will not have a clear history of success. The LSAT can be affected by your stress and anxiety, restfulness, or concentration and distraction. Build a track record of success by taking the test multiple times (at least 3 times). Evaluate your speed in each section, the types of questions you consistently answer correctly and incorrectly, and how often you guess versus knowing the answer.

    Being successful on the LSAT is like being successful in all things. Research the measures, prepare and practice the methods, and execute to the best of your ability! And, don't forget to breathe...



        Posted By: matthewniziol @ 05/04/2010 03:36 PM     LSAT Preparation     Comments (0)  

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